Discover the area

There is so much to do in the local area you will always need a second visit. There are some excellent websites full of ideas such as Welcome to Scotland, but here are a few of our favourite things to do in the local area.

 
 
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Highland Wildlife Park

This is a wonderful park for the whole family to enjoy. A word from the park:

“The award-winning RZSS Highland Wildlife Park is Scotland's best animal adventure! Get closer to nature in the breath-taking Cairngorms National Park surrounded by some of the world's rarest animals. Become immersed in the natural surroundings of the park while looking out for some of its most famous residents, including snow leopards, European grey wolves and Scotland's only polar bears. In 2018, Highland Wildlife Park welcomed the first polar bear cub to be born in the UK for 25 years - Visitors can see ‘wee’ Hamish exploring his surroundings and taking a dip in the pool under the watchful eye of mum, Victoria!”

Please note, you can not take dogs to this park (including car park) except fully trained guide dogs.

 
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Dalwhinnie Distillery Tour

Is a Scottish break complete without a Distillery tour? Dalwhinnie Distillery stands in the Cairngorm National Park at the heart of the Scottish Highlands in the village of Dalwhinnie and they produce Single Malt Scotch Whisky. From this remote but accessible location comes their liquid known as the gentle spirit. Dalwhinnie refers to its own whisky as a Highland Whisky but as it is located within both the Highland and Speyside region it can legally be called either a Highland or Speyside whisky. During the tour, a guide will give you advice on the best way to appreciate whisky and suggest other food combinations. End the tour on a high note as all adults receive a complimentary Dalwhinnie whisky glass.

 
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Cairngorms Skiing

Since the early 1960s, the nearby village of Aviemore, sitting on the A9 and Inverness to Edinburgh/Glasgow railway, has grown significantly as a tourism destination, with spectacular scenery and incredible adventure on the doorstep. It was hailed as the UK’s first ski resort offering a central hub for snow-sports enthusiasts to come and experience the wilds of the Cairngorms. Today, the incredible natural surroundings have made way for a disproportionate number of Olympic athletes in relation to the area’s population – not surprising when you consider the epic runs and spectacular terrain available for all to enjoy!

 
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Loch Insh Outdoor Centre

Only 2.5 miles away lies Loch Insh Outdoor Centre. 14 acres of native woodlands situated on the shores of Loch Insh in the heart of the Cairngorms National Park where you can eat, drink, play and explore – they have something to offer all types of group, traveller and adventure seeker from water sports and dry land activities in summer to skiing in winter. Nestled within the trees you’ll discover their Boathouse restaurant and children’s adventure play parks. They have also helped in the success of GB windsurf talents Erin Watson, Islay Watson and Andrew Brown!

 
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RSPB - Insh Marshes

The Insh Marshes covers 10 square kilometres of the River Spey floodplain between Kingussie and Kincraig in Badenoch and Strathspey. It is said to be one of the most important wetland areas in Europe, supporting populations of breeding waders including curlew, lapwing, redshank and snipe.
Read more at

 
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Invereshie and Inshriach NNR

Invereshie and Inshriach NNR lies within Cairngorms National Park, 12 kilometres south of Aviemore on Speyside. The reserve nestles against the western flank of the Cairngorms plateau. It is set in a magnificent landscape where pinewood plantation merges into naturally regenerating Caledonian forest, through moorland and alpine heath. The reserve culminates in the peak of Sgòr Gaoith (1,118 metres). It is home to some of Scotland’s most iconic species. The best news? It is just a few metres fro the front door of Soillerie House! Luckily, the area close by is not a Site of Special Scientific Interest and as such you can go walk and ride inside the forest at your hearts delight, without the fear of damaging important eco systems that are being studied. Why not find the trig point at 444m high Creag Dhubh?

 
 
 

There is plenty more to see, eat and do nearby - These links provide more info